Tag Archives: Medicine

Podcast Episode 100 and SOMSA-22

In the 100th Episode of the Prolonged Field Care Podcast Dennis sits down with Jamie, Sean and Paul to talk about the last 100 episodes and how prolonged field care evolved over the past 7 years from when the working group was established at SOMA 2013 in Tampa, FL. Sean has since moved on and retired from the military and founded a non profit, Specialized Medical Standards, dedicated to developing, and distributing high quality education and training resources to the international medical community, much of it based on the lessons learned from his unique experiences and expertise.

Listen here on our Anchor FM page, YouTube Channel or on your favorite podcast app.

Come visit Sean and Dennis at the SMS booth in the SOMSA exhibition room and see the official Prolonged Field Care update from Paul on Friday morning on the main stage.

Improvised Field Medicine Shopping List for the Austere Clinician

From tourniquets to chest seals, our community has been at the forefront of innovating, problem solving and improvising when not able to get a commercially tested and manufactured medical device. A purpose-made, evidence-based solution should always be primary in the PACE plan. After the primary manufactured and evaluated product is exhausted, what then? What is your alternate, contingency or emergency? Do you and the people that may potentially be treating you, fully grasp the principles behind all the fancy, expensive equipment that you use for the environment in which you are operating? The easiest example is the tourniquet. A tourniquet provides the user a secure mechanical advantage to apply pressure to the vessels of a limb or junction over what they would normally be able to reliably apply without something such as a windlass or ratchet system. It also incorporates materials that will not break a wide enough strap to disperse the pressure over a wider area to reduce the chance of iatrogenic injury from a narrow strap or cord. Same with a pad under the mechanism to reduce the incidence of pinching. Once the principles of these devices are fully understood, trial and error testing can begin. You must test what ever it is that you are planning to use in place of a vetted product.

Does it work?

Is it reproducible?

By your less trained partner force?

In the conditions that you will be contending with?

Once you have a plan and begin testing. Make sure you record your results, including tips and pearls so that the next person can duplicate what you did. Here is our post on bleach powder for disinfection and Dakins solution as an example. If you have something that has worked for you, please detail it in the comments below and perhaps we can add it here as an addendum or as a separate post in the future.

Improvised Medical Supplies

What if you have to improvise more than a tourniquet or IFAK contents though? Here is a list put together in the case that you find yourself in a situation where traditional MEDLOG channels cannot keep up with, you have limited budget with which to purchase purpose made supplies, or have extremely limited space with which to travel and transport equipment. This list is not comprehensive and should not limit your imagination. It should, however, help organize your thoughts and jog your memory while on your shopping trip to Walmart or Maxima. Other outlets that have some of these supplies are agricultural stores and, of course, drug stores or apothecaries.

Once you do this locally, even just by taking pictures and comparing items with others. Try doing it while traveling or on deployment to a developing country where there is no Walmart.

Some of the testing and evaluation mentioned above, may have already been done with evidence published in peer reviewed resources. Check back issues of the Journal of Special Operations Medicine. Once you sign up for a membership, either directly with a digital subscription or though a membership with SOMA, you can download all past issues via PDF and search through them. Another resource that every austere clinician should check out is the book, “Improvised Medicine 2nd Edition,” by Kenneth Iserson. I cannot recommend this book enough. As a testament to its popularity, each time I have purchased a copy for a course, it gets reappropriated. The kindle edition is a little cheaper and can’t just walk away. We probably need an Amazon Smile account with all the book recommendations I’ve made but we don’t receive money from any purchases… yet.

What would you add?

Prolonged Casualty Care for all

The wait is over…

The Role 1 Prolonged Casualty Care Guidelines for the entire DoD are now available here and on the Joint Trauma System website!
This was a monumental undertaking from the beginning and required countless hours of research, writing, deliberations, and editing from subject matter experts, volunteering from each service and academia. The baseline for these guidelines were the previous clinical practice guidelines written by members of our legacy prolonged field care working group. Where those guidelines did not meet the requirements of one of the services, the members of this new Committee on Prolonged Casualty Care came together to ensure the verbiage met those unique needs while not taking away from the underlying principle. They ain’t perfect but fill a gap which has been hanging over our heads for years. They are version 1.0 with updates already being considered. In the future, concerned parties will be able to present evidence in the same change paper format used by the other official Defense Committees on Trauma such as CoTCCC and we can update it on the official JTS website quickly and efficiently. Aside from the work done by each of the listed authors an inordinate amount of work was done by MSG Mike Remley to edit and push them through the JTS process. It would have been another 6 months or more with him. COL Jamie Riesberg led this group from the beginning while juggling his day job which has almost nothing to do with the writing and editing of guidelines. He did this out of his never-satisfied sense of Service. They both certainly have my respect for embracing the challenge when I was much more skeptical. Another unsung hero stepped up in the final quarter was Dr. Dan Mosley. There is no question that all of us were spinning our wheels and hitting all the walls when he stepped up to do the hard, unenviable and tedious work, combing through each section and editing the minutia before handing it off to Mike and the JTS team for final approval and technical writing under COL Gurney and Col Shackleford.

Thank you to all involved in these guidelines and to those who paved the way from the beginning. Now back to work.

Click to access Prolonged_Casualty_Care_Guidelines_21_Dec_2021_ID91.pdf

The PCC guidelines are a consolidated list of casualty-centric knowledge, skills, abilities, and best practices intended to serve as the DoD baseline clinical practice guidance (CPG) to direct casualty management over a prolonged period of time in austere, remote, or expeditionary settings, and/or during long-distance movements. These PCC guidelines build upon the DoD standard of care for non- medical and medical first responders as established by the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care (CoTCCC), outlined in the Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) guidelines,1 and in accordance with (IAW) DoDI 1322.24.
The guidelines were developed by the PCC Work Group (PCC WG). The PCC WG is chartered under the Defense Committee on Trauma (DCoT) to provide subject matter expertise supporting the Joint Trauma System (JTS) mission to improve trauma readiness and outcomes through evidence-driven performance improvement. The PCC WG is responsible for reviewing, assessing, and providing solutions forPCC-related shortfalls and requirements as outlined in DoD Instruction (DoDI) 1322.24, Medical Readiness Training, 16 Mar 2018, under the authority of the JTS as the DoD Center of Excellence pursuant to DoDI 6040.47, JTS, 05 Aug 2018.
Operational and medical planning should seek to avoid categorizing PCC as a primary medical support capability or control factor during deliberate risk assessment; however, an effective medical plan always
includes PCC as a contingency. Ideally, forward surgical and critical care should be provided as close to
casualties as possible to optimize survivability.
2 DoD units must be prepared for medical capacity to be overwhelmed, or for medical evacuation to be delayed or compromised. When contingencies arise, commanders’ casualty response plans during PCC situations are likely to be complex and challenging. Therefore, PCC planning, training, equipping, and sustainment strategies must be completed prior to a PCC event. The following evidence-driven PCC guidelines are designed to establish a systematic framework to synchronize critical medical decisions points into an executable PCC strategy, regardless of the nature of injury or illness, to effectively manage a complex patient and to advise commanders of associated risks. The guidelines build upon the accepted TCCC categories framed in the novel MARC2 H3-PAWS-L treatment algorithm, (Massive Hemorrhage/MASCAL, Airway, Respirations, Circulation,
Communications, Hypo/Hyperthermia and Head Injuries, Pain
Control, Antibiotics, Wounds (including Nursing and Burns),
Splinting, Logistics).
The PCC guidelines prepare the Service Member for “what to
consider next” after all TCCC interventions have been effectively
performed and should only be trained after having mastering the
principles and techniques of TCCC.
The guidelines are a consolidated list of casualty-centric knowledge, skills, abilities, and best practices are the proposed standard of care for developing and sustaining DoD programs required to enhance confidence, interoperability, and common trust among all PCC-adept personal across the Joint force. The JTS CPGs are foundational to the PCC guidelines and will be referenced throughout this document in an effort to keep these guidelines concise. General information on the Joint Trauma System is available

on the JTS website (https://jts.amedd.army.mil) and links to all of the CPGs are also available by usingthe following link: https://jts.amedd.army.mil/index.cfm/PI_CPGs/cpgs. The TCCC guidelines are included in these guidelines as an attachment because they are foundational AND prerequisite to effective PCC.

Remember, the primary goal in PCC is to get out of PCC!!!

Episode 37: PFC from the NGO Perspective With Alex Potter of GRM

Non-Governmental Organizations, Non-Profits and Volunteers have been providing critical services on the battlefield for millennia. Historically the traditional view of medical care in conflict zones was that the military focused on victory Continue reading Episode 37: PFC from the NGO Perspective With Alex Potter of GRM

Podcast Episode 36: ROLO to SOLO: The Logistics of Fresh Whole Blood Transfusion

The Trauma Hemostasis and Oxygenation Research (THOR) Network including the 75th Ranger Regiment, NORNAVSOF, and others have led the way in re-implementing type-O, low titer fresh whole blood far forward with the Ranger type-O Low titer(ROLO) program. Continue reading Podcast Episode 36: ROLO to SOLO: The Logistics of Fresh Whole Blood Transfusion

Podcast Episode 33: TIVA: Another Look at Pre-Hospital Analgesia and Sedation

Rick Hines has spent the last 20+ years in service to his country much of it deployed to combat zones and other unstable, austere environments and is dedicated to improving SOF Medicine.  He made it a point to spend a fair amount of time with surgical teams when possible and has gained quite a bit of real world knowledge that we hope to pass on to a wider audience here. Continue reading Podcast Episode 33: TIVA: Another Look at Pre-Hospital Analgesia and Sedation

Podcast Episode 31: CBRN for Dummies By COL Missy Givens

In this live recording, guest lecturer COL Missy Givens shares the CBRNe knowledge she has learned while working as a clinical toxicologist, among many other positions, around the world including as the SOCAFRICA Command Surgeon where she personally helped prepare members of 10th SFG(A) to deal with some of the most venomous snakes in the world. Continue reading Podcast Episode 31: CBRN for Dummies By COL Missy Givens

Free JSOU Book: “The Death of the Golden hour and the Return of the Guerilla Hospital” COL (RET) Warner D. “Rocky” Farr M.D.

From the Back Cover:

Colonel Warner “Rocky” Farr has made an important contribution to the body of SOF knowledge with this well-researched monograph. He advances the understanding of the many challenges and accomplishments related to guerrilla warfare medicine—care provided by predominantly indigenous medical personnel under austere conditions with limited evacuation capability— by providing a survey of the historical record in UW literature. Colonel Farr relates many historical experiences in the field, assesses their effectiveness, and lays a foundation for further in-depth study of the subject. The Joint Special Operations University is pleased to offer this monograph as a means of providing those scholars and operators, as well as policymakers and military leaders, a greater understanding of the complex and complicated field of guerrilla warfare medicine.

Download the PDF: The Death of the Golden Hour and the Return of the Guerilla Hospital -COL (RET) Warner D. Rocky Farr MD


http://jsou.libguides.com/jsoupublications/2017


COL (RET) Warner D. “Rocky” Farr Bio

PFC Grand Rounds Talk at UC Davis Health

Here is a great video on PFC and the cases we helped collect from Air Force MAJ Eric DeSoucy, DO doing a Grand Rounds talk for the Department of Surgery at UC Davis.

Here is the study he referenced in the video which he also happened to head up for our working group and the Joint Trauma System.

54 pfc cases 20171121DeSoucy

New JTS AAR Submission Forms for Data Collection Trauma Registry

Stories and experiences can sometimes bring relevancy to a situation you are in or to a point you are trying to make while instructing. These singular stories are called anecdotes and while powerful and personal do not represent similar patient outcomes even in similar situations. They are not science. They do not take into account the vast number of variables that were present in that particular situation. Often these stories can mislead and misinform medical practice by inexperienced medics and practitioners due to that powerful personal experience clouding that person’s own judgment.

Continue reading New JTS AAR Submission Forms for Data Collection Trauma Registry

Podcast Episode 28: Critical Skills for Prolonged Field Care Providers

Training materials were the number 1 most requested item from our SOMSA AAR.  We have put out other training recommendations in the past but wanted to also highlight some important skills that will help you identify gaps in your PFC training program, plan future training and measure progress.  We will get more into this cycle in the future however, this should be a good place to start.  Many thanks go out to Andrew who labored over many versions of the list over the past few months.  One last thing, be sure that you are already at 100% T for Trained on your TCCC task list.  There is no use in getting into PFC training prior to mastering TCCC.  If you see something we may have overlooked and would like to see it on future versions, please comment below and let us know.

Prolonged Field Care Critical Task List Final

Teaching and Training Recommendations from March 2014

 

Podcast Episode 20: TBI Round Table and Case Discussion

This podcast is a follow up from our last post on managing traumatic brain injuries in austere environments.  We included a scenario discussion with David, Jamie, Daryl, Jay, Doug and I with much needed answers to some frequently asked questions. Continue reading Podcast Episode 20: TBI Round Table and Case Discussion

How to make labels to practice Medication administration:

Tactical Trauma Casualty Care(TCCC) and Prolonged Field Care can be heavy on the medication administration, but during training we can’t really give our real role player patients or even our mannequins a bunch of narcotics and other controlled substances, so it’s often verbalized in training. Not training on the medication they carry downrange, far from providers, can lead to improper Continue reading How to make labels to practice Medication administration:

Podcast Episode 5: Part 2 of the Pharm Series… The MSMAID Acronym From Anesthesia Adapted to Prolonged Field Care

Pharm Part 2

Justin and Brad continue the discussion of pharmacology started last episode by talking about the MSMAID Acronym/Mnemonic and how it applies to the way SOF Medics should be  Continue reading Podcast Episode 5: Part 2 of the Pharm Series… The MSMAID Acronym From Anesthesia Adapted to Prolonged Field Care

Podcast Episode 4: Part 1 of the Pharm Series… 12 Principals of Pharmacology

Pharm Part 1

In this great podcast Justin introduces the principals of pharmacology that have served him well over the years and have done far more for him than simply keeping him out of trouble.  He also introduces Brad Morgans CRNA who is a wealth of knowledge and experience in Continue reading Podcast Episode 4: Part 1 of the Pharm Series… 12 Principals of Pharmacology