Category Archives: Training

PFC and The Surgical Team Deficit

The vast majority of SOF deployments occur outside combat zones where the SOF Medic is expected to care for the entire team without a credentialed provider.  

Faced with a low level of risk, SOF Commanders opt to accept it.

The team also willingly accepts it due to the confidence that they have in the Medic.

Medics and Corpsmen bear the burden of the risk assumed by the Commander.

There is no Doc. 

No PA. 

No dentist or Vet. 

No surgical team or MEDEVAC standing by.  

What can be done? Hint… It’s training

In 2019 a US News investigation into the readiness of the military trauma system concluded with a series of articles to support what we already “knew” and were moving to address with the development of PFC Clinical Practice Guidelines, training events and tailoring hospital rotations.

A Crack in the Armor: Military Health System Isn’t Ready for Battlefield Injuries

Surgical readiness in the Military Health Service is fraying fast. A nine-month U.S. News investigation has uncovered mounting evidence that military medical leaders are squandering a valuable wartime asset: the surgeons and surgical teams that save lives on the battlefield and back home. The investigation is the latest chapter in a continuing U.S.

One of the PFC Truths is that If you think you need a surgical team or intensivist, you should bring one. If there already aren’t enough to go around to higher risk deployments, bringing one to the lower risk trips may not even be an option. Guys still get hurt on these trips.

Military Surgery in the Spotlight

SAN FRANCISCO – It took two surgeons 92 sponges and two towels to stop the soldier’s abdominal bleeding. To the surgeons’ horror, an otherwise routine exploratory surgery on a trauma patient had become life-threatening, within minutes. Retired Air Force Col.

“No one minds deploying, but it is too often, and since there’s usually not much to do [surgically], I know we lose our skills,” says an active-duty military surgeon.

Even the former Trauma Consultant to the former Army Surgeon General weighed in with a 13-page opinion on the topic summarized in the series:

“The Forgotten Surgeon Warriors.”

Top Army Surgeon Blasts Military’s Capability to Handle War Traumas

The Army’s top trauma surgeon has issued a powerful critique of military surgery, asserting that Army medicine is not “manned, trained or equipped” for the flood of complex battlefield casualties that would occur in even a limited war. “The failure of military medical leaders to acknowledge the critical requirement for trauma surgeons …

Once the surgeons openly (somewhat) established that bringing a whole surgical team, even a small one, to every deployment is just not a plausible solution, many attempts were made to increase the scope of practice of the enlisted clinician. This was a second order effect of the campaign to improve battlefield surgery along with the growing realization of this lack of support. 

What can be done? The first thing that should be implemented more widely is honesty. We need to be honest with ourselves first.  What are our capabilities and limitations relative to our training and experience overlaid onto caring for the complex casualties that we may expect to see? Once we come to terms with that, we need to accurately convey these limitations to Commanders who are charged with assuming the risk.  There should be a frank conversation about doctrinal evacuation timelines and policy compared to the pathophysiology with some of the more dangerous possibilities such as blunt trauma from a vehicle rollover, falls, envenomations, training accidents and other DNBI. “The stuff that keeps Medics up at night.” As stated by JB early on.

If the mission is to include higher risk activity, then a surgical team should rightly be requested.  At the end of the day though, as noted above, there may just not be enough to go around. If given the choice, we would probably all take a small surgical team with us so that we could focus on other aspects of the mission.  This is where honesty comes in again.  Just like the early days of the GWOT when every casualty was “Urgent Surgical” and over triage caused some misallocation of resources, an honest and critical assessment will bear out the actual risks and probability. That still leaves some risk to force that the Commander may assume.  That is the reason that additional training experience is crucial. That is why we are so adamant on being great at the basics but also going a little beyond.  No one is coming, not in time anyway. It is our job to recognize a bad situation early, use telemedicine when possible and temporize to the best of our ability, not to be a one man surgical team. This is instilled through rigorous and realistic training.

Training and Utilization.

Not Stuff.

Podcast Episode 61: TBI Update with Dr. VanWyck

 

Listen Now:

http://traffic.libsyn.com/specialoperationsmedicine/PFC_TBI_update_Final.mp3

Show Notes: Continue reading Podcast Episode 61: TBI Update with Dr. VanWyck

Podcast Episode 48: Maximizing Hospital Rotations and Medical Proficiency Training

Hospital rotations for medical proficiency training give medics who operate in the field the opportunity to see what “right” looks like. Knowing this and understanding treatment principles can allow a flexible medic to adapt to unique situations in the absence of protocols, guidelines and evidence. If properly coordinated and supported, MPTs can be an invaluable and eye opening experience. When thrown together with a naive or indifferent staff or unmotivated medic, it can be a huge waste of time and money for everyone involved. Continue reading Podcast Episode 48: Maximizing Hospital Rotations and Medical Proficiency Training

Standard Prolonged Field Care Training Curriculum Crowdsource Project

It has been our experience that high quality prolonged field care training takes time, resources and expertise by dedicated trainers well versed and experienced in critical care concepts. That being said we also believe that there are fundamental principles which can help

Continue reading Standard Prolonged Field Care Training Curriculum Crowdsource Project

Podcast Episode 36: ROLO to SOLO: The Logistics of Fresh Whole Blood Transfusion

The Trauma Hemostasis and Oxygenation Research (THOR) Network including the 75th Ranger Regiment, NORNAVSOF, and others have led the way in re-implementing type-O, low titer fresh whole blood far forward with the Ranger type-O Low titer(ROLO) program. Continue reading Podcast Episode 36: ROLO to SOLO: The Logistics of Fresh Whole Blood Transfusion

New CPG! Traumatic Brain Injury Management in PFC

Traumatic Brain Injuries coupled with other injuries can be one of the most difficult wound patterns to manage in the field. Learn to manage TBI Continue reading New CPG! Traumatic Brain Injury Management in PFC

Podcast Episode 31: CBRN for Dummies By COL Missy Givens

In this live recording, guest lecturer COL Missy Givens shares the CBRNe knowledge she has learned while working as a clinical toxicologist, among many other positions, around the world including as the SOCAFRICA Command Surgeon where she personally helped prepare members of 10th SFG(A) to deal with some of the most venomous snakes in the world. Continue reading Podcast Episode 31: CBRN for Dummies By COL Missy Givens

Podcast Episode 30: REBOA?! with Joe DuBose

You are in your Team House or BAS. You have given FDP, Whole blood, TXA calcium and don’t have much left despite the few units from the walking blood bank. Your patient continues to bleed internally. Nothing in the chest or upper abdomen. Probably pelvic. Damn. MEDEVAC is en route. They will have some blood too. You just need your patient to hold on for another hour before he gets to surgery… Continue reading Podcast Episode 30: REBOA?! with Joe DuBose

Podcast Episode 28: Critical Skills for Prolonged Field Care Providers

Training materials were the number 1 most requested item from our SOMSA AAR.  We have put out other training recommendations in the past but wanted to also highlight some important skills that will help you identify gaps in your PFC training program, plan future training and measure progress.  We will get more into this cycle in the future however, this should be a good place to start.  Many thanks go out to Andrew who labored over many versions of the list over the past few months.  One last thing, be sure that you are already at 100% T for Trained on your TCCC task list.  There is no use in getting into PFC training prior to mastering TCCC.  If you see something we may have overlooked and would like to see it on future versions, please comment below and let us know.

Prolonged Field Care Critical Task List Final

Teaching and Training Recommendations from March 2014