Tag Archives: Training

Podcast Episode 100 and SOMSA-22

In the 100th Episode of the Prolonged Field Care Podcast Dennis sits down with Jamie, Sean and Paul to talk about the last 100 episodes and how prolonged field care evolved over the past 7 years from when the working group was established at SOMA 2013 in Tampa, FL. Sean has since moved on and retired from the military and founded a non profit, Specialized Medical Standards, dedicated to developing, and distributing high quality education and training resources to the international medical community, much of it based on the lessons learned from his unique experiences and expertise.

Listen here on our Anchor FM page, YouTube Channel or on your favorite podcast app.

Come visit Sean and Dennis at the SMS booth in the SOMSA exhibition room and see the official Prolonged Field Care update from Paul on Friday morning on the main stage.

Improvised Field Medicine Shopping List for the Austere Clinician

From tourniquets to chest seals, our community has been at the forefront of innovating, problem solving and improvising when not able to get a commercially tested and manufactured medical device. A purpose-made, evidence-based solution should always be primary in the PACE plan. After the primary manufactured and evaluated product is exhausted, what then? What is your alternate, contingency or emergency? Do you and the people that may potentially be treating you, fully grasp the principles behind all the fancy, expensive equipment that you use for the environment in which you are operating? The easiest example is the tourniquet. A tourniquet provides the user a secure mechanical advantage to apply pressure to the vessels of a limb or junction over what they would normally be able to reliably apply without something such as a windlass or ratchet system. It also incorporates materials that will not break a wide enough strap to disperse the pressure over a wider area to reduce the chance of iatrogenic injury from a narrow strap or cord. Same with a pad under the mechanism to reduce the incidence of pinching. Once the principles of these devices are fully understood, trial and error testing can begin. You must test what ever it is that you are planning to use in place of a vetted product.

Does it work?

Is it reproducible?

By your less trained partner force?

In the conditions that you will be contending with?

Once you have a plan and begin testing. Make sure you record your results, including tips and pearls so that the next person can duplicate what you did. Here is our post on bleach powder for disinfection and Dakins solution as an example. If you have something that has worked for you, please detail it in the comments below and perhaps we can add it here as an addendum or as a separate post in the future.

Improvised Medical Supplies

What if you have to improvise more than a tourniquet or IFAK contents though? Here is a list put together in the case that you find yourself in a situation where traditional MEDLOG channels cannot keep up with, you have limited budget with which to purchase purpose made supplies, or have extremely limited space with which to travel and transport equipment. This list is not comprehensive and should not limit your imagination. It should, however, help organize your thoughts and jog your memory while on your shopping trip to Walmart or Maxima. Other outlets that have some of these supplies are agricultural stores and, of course, drug stores or apothecaries.

Once you do this locally, even just by taking pictures and comparing items with others. Try doing it while traveling or on deployment to a developing country where there is no Walmart.

Some of the testing and evaluation mentioned above, may have already been done with evidence published in peer reviewed resources. Check back issues of the Journal of Special Operations Medicine. Once you sign up for a membership, either directly with a digital subscription or though a membership with SOMA, you can download all past issues via PDF and search through them. Another resource that every austere clinician should check out is the book, “Improvised Medicine 2nd Edition,” by Kenneth Iserson. I cannot recommend this book enough. As a testament to its popularity, each time I have purchased a copy for a course, it gets reappropriated. The kindle edition is a little cheaper and can’t just walk away. We probably need an Amazon Smile account with all the book recommendations I’ve made but we don’t receive money from any purchases… yet.

What would you add?

Standard Prolonged Field Care Training Curriculum Crowdsource Project

It has been our experience that high quality prolonged field care training takes time, resources and expertise by dedicated trainers well versed and experienced in critical care concepts. That being said we also believe that there are fundamental principles which can help

Continue reading Standard Prolonged Field Care Training Curriculum Crowdsource Project

Podcast Episode 36: ROLO to SOLO: The Logistics of Fresh Whole Blood Transfusion

The Trauma Hemostasis and Oxygenation Research (THOR) Network including the 75th Ranger Regiment, NORNAVSOF, and others have led the way in re-implementing type-O, low titer fresh whole blood far forward with the Ranger type-O Low titer(ROLO) program. Continue reading Podcast Episode 36: ROLO to SOLO: The Logistics of Fresh Whole Blood Transfusion

Podcast Episode 31: CBRN for Dummies By COL Missy Givens

In this live recording, guest lecturer COL Missy Givens shares the CBRNe knowledge she has learned while working as a clinical toxicologist, among many other positions, around the world including as the SOCAFRICA Command Surgeon where she personally helped prepare members of 10th SFG(A) to deal with some of the most venomous snakes in the world. Continue reading Podcast Episode 31: CBRN for Dummies By COL Missy Givens

PFC Grand Rounds Talk at UC Davis Health

Here is a great video on PFC and the cases we helped collect from Air Force MAJ Eric DeSoucy, DO doing a Grand Rounds talk for the Department of Surgery at UC Davis.

Here is the study he referenced in the video which he also happened to head up for our working group and the Joint Trauma System.

54 pfc cases 20171121DeSoucy

Podcast Episode 28: Critical Skills for Prolonged Field Care Providers

Training materials were the number 1 most requested item from our SOMSA AAR.  We have put out other training recommendations in the past but wanted to also highlight some important skills that will help you identify gaps in your PFC training program, plan future training and measure progress.  We will get more into this cycle in the future however, this should be a good place to start.  Many thanks go out to Andrew who labored over many versions of the list over the past few months.  One last thing, be sure that you are already at 100% T for Trained on your TCCC task list.  There is no use in getting into PFC training prior to mastering TCCC.  If you see something we may have overlooked and would like to see it on future versions, please comment below and let us know.

Prolonged Field Care Critical Task List Final

Teaching and Training Recommendations from March 2014